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“Whether to Go or Not”

The Rev. Wilbert Miller’s Sermon
“Whether to Go or Not”
January 5, 2017 (Eve of the Epiphany of Our Lord)
Matthew 2: 1-12

When the Wise Men arrived in Jerusalem, this is the first question they asked, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews?” They had made it to Jerusalem by the guiding of a star but they needed additional help. They needed someone well versed in biblical matters to help them find God’s son.

As you can well imagine, the chief priests and scribes in Jerusalem knew exactly where to find the Messiah—after all, they were experts in such matters and so they told the Magi: “In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet: ‘And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd my people Israel.’”

This information leaves us befuddled: if the religious leaders and Bible scholars knew where to find the Christ Child, why didn’t they hot tail it to Bethlehem themselves—it was only six miles away?

Matthew does not provide us with an answer to our question so let’s venture a guess: they needed more information!

Good people often need more information before acting decisively: we want to do things right. I have a hunch that those religious scholars in Jerusalem read religious tomes night and day, searching for exactly the right answer. And yet, isn’t it the truth that finally God beckons us to start the hike to Bethlehem without all the answers? Isn’t there a point when we finally must act, even though it is done with considerable fear and trembling? At this point, all we can do is trust that God will be gracious and merciful even if we take a wrong turn or two on the journey?

Maybe the religious leaders and scholars weren’t convinced God would be merciful to them if they made an error in judgment.

Or…might the religious leaders have hesitated to go to Bethlehem, not because they didn’t have enough information, but because they had too much? Perhaps they knew King Herod’s fearsome side, sensing that worshiping the tiny Savior would cause him to unleash all manner of mayhem throughout Judea. Maybe they had learned their history lessons well; maybe they knew that Herod, far from being confident and bold, was actually thin-skinned and insecure and would blow a gasket and butcher a bunch of innocent little boys under two if they went to Bethlehem. Maybe they determined that by not going to seek the Messiah, they would spare the world Herod’s disgusting violence. Could it be by exercising a modicum of patience, the chief priests and scribes were actually the real “wise men” in this story?

Each of us finally faces the question whether or not to go to Bethlehem. In the coming year, our congregation will inevitably face tough questions—as the people who follow Jesus always do. It would be presumptuous for me to speculate how 2017 will unfold for us here at Holy Trinity, but the question is: will we side with the poor babe who ended up in rundown housing in Bethlehem and whose parents ended up carrying him off as a refugee to a distant land or will we be more prudent than that, opting for calm instead?

Think about it: right now, as we worship, twelve homeless women are eating and sleeping in our shelter downstairs. They are our sisters and they are much like our brother Jesus whose parents found no room in the inn. Will we stand up for them if push comes to shove or will we opt for peace and calm, fearing how the Herods in our own day might respond? Clearly the religious leaders and scholars opted for peace and calm; clearly the Wise Men risked mayhem to side with the poor baby in Bethlehem…What will our decision be?

The world was turned upside on that first Epiphany because Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazar opted to take a little six-mile hike to Bethlehem and to present their gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh to God come to earth. They had no idea what fury would soon be unleashed by that bully Herod and his minions. What was guaranteed was that if they wanted to behold the face of God, they would have to oppose the powerful and side with a poor, vulnerable child.

God invites us tonight to take the six-mile journey, over and over again, and to invite others to join us in the thrill of worshiping the sweet Babe of Bethlehem. It is a simple journey and yet an often treacherous and bewildering one.

Ours is a harsh and astonishing calling to be the people of God in this world. The only guarantee we have is that Christ awaits us at the manger, murmuring, “Take and eat, given for you.” And that is enough for now and, really, it is all we will ever need.